About Matt Kelly

Matt is an independent science journalist, and the author and editor of The Bee Report.

Entobarbie: Getting up close with insects and being awed by them

Image of Entobarbie in her lab with mason bee tube.

Are you following Entobarbie on the socials? If not, you’ll want to check her out. The accounts on Instagram and Twitter feature Barbie (yes, the classic doll) engaging with real, living insects both in a Barbie-sized lab and out in the real-sized world of flowers and grass. These entomological vignettes are presented through absolutely incredible photography and with the language of a scientist. Here is a Bee Report exclusive interview with the creator of this entomological influencer – who wishes to remain anonymous for the time being. It includes photos that Entobarbie took just for this story. Enjoy!

One year anniversary for our paper on the bees of GSENM

Map showing bee species richness in the monument.

It was one year ago today that Joe Wilson, Olivia Carril and I published our paper that explores how shrinking and carving up the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument might impact the incredible bee communities that live there. The issues raised in the paper are what took us back to the monument this past summer to continue studying the bees and create our documentary film. Give it a read when you have the chance, it’s open access.

Will state policies predict national action to protect pollinators?

Map showing pollinator policies by state.

One thing I’ve enjoyed tracking and following this year is the seemingly increasing number of state-level initiatives to protect bee and insect populations. The Saving America’s Pollinators Act is a bill that’s been introduced several different times at the federal level but has, once again, stalled out in committee. The current national political conditions seem much more conducive to state and local actions when it comes to taking bees and other insects into consideration.

A new way to assess the danger that pesticides can pose to bees

Image of female hoary squash bee.

Discussing the hazards that different pesticides might potentially pose to bees can be a frustrating and tricky thing. The problem is that risk assessments are done with honey bees. And the honey bee is by no means representative of the roughly 3,999 other bee species in North America. Sure, a certain dose of a certain chemical under certain conditions might not kill off a perennial honey bee colony with tens of thousands of individuals. But what would the effect be on a single bee who is alive for only six weeks, raising her brood of eight? Especially when the greatest exposure to pesticides can come from the soil.

This has been a bad week for bees

Image of rusty patch bumble bee.

The Trump administration weakened the Endangered Species Act. Franklin’s bumble bee is being considered for the Endangered Species List – but under the newly-weakened law. And the yellow-banded bumble bee won’t be considered for protection as an endangered or threatened species (despite the fact that it’s now found in only 14 of the 25 states it used to inhabit).

The Bees of Grand Staircase-Escalante is an “Awesome Project”

Image of researchers hiking into desert.

(The Bees of GSENM project) Back in July, ioby – the not-for-profit crowdfunding team and platform we used for our project – chose to showcase The Bees of Grand Staircase-Escalante as an “Awesome Project”. They spent quite a bit of time talking with me, asking questions, and crafting a really solid piece explaining both the how and the why of the project. If you haven’t yet read ioby’s showcase of our project, please do.