Gulf Coast bee, Delaware firefly move toward endangered species protection

Image of Gulf Coast solitary bee on yellow flower.

(Center for Biological Diversity) The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today it will move forward with considering Endangered Species Act protection for the Gulf Coast solitary bee and Bethany Beach firefly. Both coastal species face increasing threats from climate-driven sea-level rise, unchecked coastal development and pesticides.

Members of European Parliament call for reduction in pesticides to protect bees

Image of honey bees on frame.

(EU News) The Environment, Public Health and Food Safety Committee for the European Union on Tuesday approved a resolution highlighting weaknesses in the EU Pollinator Initiative that render it inadequate to address the main causes of pollinators’ decline in Europe. The committee proposes that a reduction in the use of pesticides be set as a “common indicator” to evaluate how effective national measures are in protecting bees and other pollinators. To help further decrease pesticide residues in bee habitats, members of the European Parliament want the reduction of pesticide use to become a key part of the future Common Agricultural Policy.

Willamette Valley prairie flower becomes Endangered Species Act success story

Image of Bradshaw's desert parsley.

(Center for Biological Diversity) The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed removing Bradshaw’s desert parsley, a wet prairie wildflower, from the list of endangered species this week due to the plant’s successful recovery. Insects observed to pollinate this plant include some small native bees.

House panel advances bill to curb pesticides on wildlife refuges

Image of silhouette of bird and grass.

(Bloomberg Environment) The Protect Our Refuges Act of 2019 (H.R. 2854) would reinstate a 2014 ban on the use of neonicotinoid insecticides in national wildlife refuges. The Trump administration’s Interior Department revoked the 2014 ban in August of 2018, citing the increased importance of genetically modified (GMO) seed crops, which often contain neonicotinoid seed coatings, for maintaining agricultural operations of wildlife preserves.

Will state policies predict national action to protect pollinators?

Map showing pollinator policies by state.

One thing I’ve enjoyed tracking and following this year is the seemingly increasing number of state-level initiatives to protect bee and insect populations. The Saving America’s Pollinators Act is a bill that’s been introduced several different times at the federal level but has, once again, stalled out in committee. The current national political conditions seem much more conducive to state and local actions when it comes to taking bees and other insects into consideration.

Decade-long drought in Chile wipes out hives as bees are left without flowers

Image of honey bees at bee feeder.

(Reuters) “There’s no water anywhere. The bees are suffering just the same as cattle, crops and people.” Concern over the impact of changing environments on bees has reached the highest levels of government in Chile. The country has already unleashed millions in aid for drought-stricken farmers. In August, it said it would include a line item in future agency budgets to account for the ‘costs’ of climate change.