Beekeepers worried EEE spraying will harm bees in Indiana, Michigan

Image of mosquitoes in net.

(WSBT) In Michigan, tens of thousands of hives could be impacted. Even if bees don’t fly around at night time, that doesn’t mean the pesticide won’t impact their colony. “We don’t have a good sense on how much can be drawn into the hives, because the bees do create airflow in the colonies at night. And we don’t know how much will be deposited on the flowers that the bees will visit the next day.”

New England power line corridors harbor rare bees and other wild things

Image of researchers collecting bees beneath power lines.

(The Conversation) To many people, power line corridors are eyesores that alter wild lands. But ecologically they are swaths of open, scrubby landscapes under transmission lines that support a rich and complex menagerie of life. New England researchers have surveyed bee communities in these corridors, finding numerous native species – including one of which is so rare it was thought to have been lost decades ago from the United States.

Climate change could pit species against one another as they shift ranges

Image of wildflowers with mountain in background.

(University of British Columbia) Species have few good options when it comes to surviving climate change; they can genetically adapt to new conditions, shift their ranges, or both. But new research indicates that conflicts between species as they adapt and shift ranges could lead experts to underestimate extinctions, and underscores the importance of landscape connectivity. “The good news is this conflict between moving and adapting is reduced when movement rates are high, which emphasizes the importance of maintaining well-connected landscapes.”

New research provides important insights into how different species might survive extreme climate events

Image of blazing sun over city.

(Washington University in St. Louis) Faced with unprecedented change in their environments, animals and plants are scrambling to catch up — with mixed results. Researchers have developed a new model that helps to predict the types of changes that could drive a given species to extinction. This model could give wildlife managers and conservation organizations insight into the potential vulnerabilities of different species based on relatively simple assessments of their natural histories and historical environments.

EU moves ahead on tightening pesticide risk criteria for bees

Image of honey bee backlit by sun.

(Bloomberg Environment) The European Union plans to tighten the criteria it uses to assess how harmful pesticides may be to honey bees, potentially making it harder for manufacturers to get authorized for some of their products. The tighter criteria would become mandatory when evaluating how pesticides affect bees in the short-term, under a draft rule the European Parliament’s environment committee discussed Sept. 25.