New smartphone technology aimed at protecting bees during local almond bloom

Image of honey bees on almond blooms.

(The Bakersfield Californian) BeeWhere, a smartphone app introduced statewide in California last fall, lets beekeepers register their colonies’ location so that companies applying pesticides and fungicides know not to spray or fumigate nearby during daytime hours when honey bees tend to be outside their hives. According to California state law, chemicals deemed to be a threat to honey bees may not be applied within one mile of a bee colony.

‘Like sending bees to war’: the deadly truth behind your almond-milk obsession

Image of beekeeper standing next to two hives.

(The Guardian) Commercial honey bees are considered livestock by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But no other class of livestock comes close to the scorched-earth circumstances that these bees face in the toxic chemical soup of California’s Central Valley, fertilizing almonds one blossom at a time. “The high mortality rate creates a sad business model for beekeepers. It’s like sending the bees to war. Many don’t come back.”