Minnesota cities could get power to ban pesticides as bee populations fall

Image of rusty patched bumble bee on Joe Pye weed.

(The Star Tribune) Lawmakers may give cities throughout Minnesota the authority to ban some widely used pesticides – including neonicotinoids – as native bumble bee and pollinator populations continue to collapse. The recently-introduced measure would grant each city the choice to issue a blanket ban on a group of pesticides that the Minnesota Department of Agriculture has labeled as lethal to pollinators.

California banned chlorpyrifos from your food. Now it won’t be manufactured

Image of helicopter spraying.

(Los Angeles Times) The primary manufacturer of a pesticide banned by California and the European Union said it will no longer produce the chemical. The move comes as the market for chlorpyrifos, which has been linked to developmental disorders and is toxic to bees, shrinks rapidly — the European Union followed California’s lead in banning it, as has New York.

EU Commission bans Bayer pesticide linked to harming bees

Image of Bayer flags.

(Reuters) The European Commission decided not to renew approval for thiacloprid. The Commission based its assessment on findings of the European Food Safety Agency published in January last year. The findings highlighted concerns about the active substance being toxic for humans and present in too great a concentration in ground water. The pesticide also harms bees and bumblebees, weakening their immune systems and impairing their reproduction, the findings said.

Neonicotinoids: despite EU moratorium, bees still at risk

Image of honey bees on comb.

(CNRS) Despite a 2013 moratorium on the use of neonicotinoids in the European Union, residues of these insecticides can still be detected in rape nectar from 48 percent of the plots studied, their concentrations varying greatly over the years. These findings indicate that persistent use of neonicotinoids with certain crops in open fields threatens bees and pollinators frequenting other, untreated crops; they confirm that residues remain and spread in the environment.

House panel advances bill to curb pesticides on wildlife refuges

Image of silhouette of bird and grass.

(Bloomberg Environment) The Protect Our Refuges Act of 2019 (H.R. 2854) would reinstate a 2014 ban on the use of neonicotinoid insecticides in national wildlife refuges. The Trump administration’s Interior Department revoked the 2014 ban in August of 2018, citing the increased importance of genetically modified (GMO) seed crops, which often contain neonicotinoid seed coatings, for maintaining agricultural operations of wildlife preserves.

European lawmakers vote to strengthen bee protection

Image of honey bees.

(StarTribune) The European Parliament on Wednesday blocked a diluted proposal by the 28-nation bloc’s executive arm on protecting bees from pesticides, arguing it didn’t go far enough. European lawmakers adopted a resolution urging the European Commission to “table new legislation based on the latest scientific and technical knowledge.” They said the Commission weakened its initial proposal due to the opposition of 16 member states which did not want provisions in the draft on how pesticides should be tested to protect bees from chronic exposure.