Willamette Valley prairie flower becomes Endangered Species Act success story

Image of Bradshaw's desert parsley.

(Center for Biological Diversity) The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed removing Bradshaw’s desert parsley, a wet prairie wildflower, from the list of endangered species this week due to the plant’s successful recovery. Insects observed to pollinate this plant include some small native bees.

Butterfly on a bomb range: Endangered Species Act at work

Image of St. Francis Satyr butterfly on leaf.

(AP) As a 400-pound explosive resounds in the distance, a tiny St. Francis Satyr butterfly flits among the splotchy leaves, ready to lay as many as 100 eggs. One of Earth’s rarest butterfly species, there are maybe 3,000 St. Francis Satyrs. There are never going to be enough of them to get off the endangered species list, but they’re not about to go extinct either – thanks in great measure to the 46-year-old federal act.

Rusty patched bumble bee discovered in Minnesota bluffland area

Image of rusty patched bumble bee on flower.

(StarTribune) The federally endangered bumble bee — a single male of the species — has been discovered at the Pine Bend Bluffs Natural Area in Inver Grove Heights, a positive sign for ecologists who have worked on restoring the area. Just one bee represents approximately 0.2 percent of the species’ known world population. Minnesota hosts the largest population of the bee in the world, with about 35 percent of the species buzzing about in the Twin Cities metro area.

New research provides important insights into how different species might survive extreme climate events

Image of blazing sun over city.

(Washington University in St. Louis) Faced with unprecedented change in their environments, animals and plants are scrambling to catch up — with mixed results. Researchers have developed a new model that helps to predict the types of changes that could drive a given species to extinction. This model could give wildlife managers and conservation organizations insight into the potential vulnerabilities of different species based on relatively simple assessments of their natural histories and historical environments.

Settlement requires feds to act on critical habitat protections for endangered rusty patched bumble bee

Image of rusty patched bumble bee.

(NRDC) The Natural Resources Defense Council and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service settled a lawsuit over the failure to protect habitat necessary for the recovery of the rusty patched bumble bee, as required under the Endangered Species Act. The settlement will require USFWS to propose “critical habitat” by July 31, 2020, unless it makes a finding that habitat protections are not prudent. The Service must then finalize any habitat protections by July 31, 2021.

MassWildlife: Bald eagles are rebounding, but bumble bees are now endangered

Image of bumble bee on purple flower.

(WBUR) Massachusetts’ Division of Fisheries and Wildlife is proposing an update to its list of endangered, threatened and special concern species to include three bees. The American bumble bee and Walsh’s Anthopora would be listed as endangered, while the yellow-banded bumble bee would be listed as threatened. The state Fisheries and Wildlife Board plans an Aug. 28 public hearing at MassWildlife’s Westborough field headquarters to take feedback on the proposed changes.

California Fish and Game Commission adds four bumble bees to candidate list

Image of bumble bee on pink flower.

(JD Supra/Nossaman LLP) The Commission voted 3-1 that listing four subspecies of bumble bee may be warranted under the California Endangered Species Act (CESA).​ The decision was made after the Xerces Society, Center for Food Safety, and Defenders of Wildlife filed a petition to list the Crotch bumble bee, Franklin’s bumble bee, Suckley cuckoo bumble bee, and western bumble bee as endangered species.