New Xerces fact sheet takes a deeper look at fungicides and their effects on pollinators

Graphic showing how fungicides can impact the health of pollinators.

(Xerces Society) Research has shown that some fungicides kill bees on contact. Studies have shown that some fungicides increase the toxic effects of certain insecticides. Fungicide exposure has also been linked to higher levels of parasitic and viral infections in honey bee colonies, suggesting that some fungicides may impair a bee’s ability to fight disease. The Xerces Society’s new fact sheet, “Protecting Pollinators from Pesticides: Fungicide Impacts on Pollinators”, reviews the current literature on fungicides and pollinators to help piece together potential risks and how best to respond.

A combination of agrochemicals shortens the life of bees, study shows

Close up of bee on flower.

(São Paulo Research Foundation) A new study by Brazilian biologists suggests that the effect of pesticides on bees could be worse than previously thought. Even when used at a level considered nonlethal, an insecticide curtailed the lives of bees by up to 50 percent. The researchers also found that a fungicide deemed safe for bees altered the behavior of workers and made them lethargic, potentially jeopardizing the survival of the entire colony.

Sivanto pesticide cocktail can harm honey bees

Image of honey bee on purple flower.

(University of California – San Diego) Recent research shows that worst-case, field-realistic doses of Sivanto, in combination with a common fungicide, can synergistically harm honey bee behavior and survival. “The idea that this pesticide is a silver bullet in the sense that it will kill all the bad things but preserve the good things is very alluring but deserves caution.”