Lawsuit attacks Trump administration failure to protect hundreds of species from extinction

Image of western bumble bee.

(Center for Biological Diversity) The Center for Biological Diversity has sued the Trump administration for failing to decide whether 241 plants and animals across the country should be protected under the Endangered Species Act. Among the species covered by the lawsuit is the western bumble bee, whose population has declined 84 percent over the past two decades.

If bumble bees become endangered in California, farmers say it sets a ‘dangerous precedent’

Image of western bumble bee in yellow flowers.

(CapRadio) Last June, the California Fish and Game Commission decided to list four bees as candidates to be endangered species, writing that there was a “substantial possibility” that the bees would end up protected by the act. Their candidacy provides temporary protection. But many agricultural interests are upset over the listing, and are suing to stop the insects from joining the more than 250 species protected by the act.

Xerces, Defenders, CFS seek to join lawsuit defending decision to protect four native bees in California

Image of Crotch's bumble bee on flowers.

(Xerces Society) The Xerces Society, Defenders of Wildlife and the Center for Food Safety contend that the California Fish and Game Commission has clear legal authority to place insects on the state’s endangered species list. There is also strong scientific support that these four bee species meet the requirements for listing. Under the current regulatory timeline, the Commission is likely to make a final decision to place these four species on the list this year, making these bees the first invertebrate pollinators to receive such protection in California.

Lawsuit challenges EPA’s 200 million-acre expansion of pesticide harmful to bees

Image of leafcutter bee.

(Center for Biological Diversity) The Center for Biological Diversity and Center for Food Safety have sued the Trump administration over its July decision to approve use of the pesticide sulfoxaflor across more than 200 million acres of crops. The approval was granted despite the fact that the Environmental Protection Agency’s own scientists concluded that sulfoxaflor is “very highly toxic” to bees. The decision expands the pesticide’s use to a wide range of crops that attract bees, including soybeans, cotton, strawberries, squash and citrus. The Center’s fact sheet on sulfoxaflor can be found here.