Beekeepers worried EEE spraying will harm bees in Indiana, Michigan

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(WSBT) In Michigan, tens of thousands of hives could be impacted. Even if bees don’t fly around at night time, that doesn’t mean the pesticide won’t impact their colony. “We don’t have a good sense on how much can be drawn into the hives, because the bees do create airflow in the colonies at night. And we don’t know how much will be deposited on the flowers that the bees will visit the next day.”

EU moves ahead on tightening pesticide risk criteria for bees

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(Bloomberg Environment) The European Union plans to tighten the criteria it uses to assess how harmful pesticides may be to honey bees, potentially making it harder for manufacturers to get authorized for some of their products. The tighter criteria would become mandatory when evaluating how pesticides affect bees in the short-term, under a draft rule the European Parliament’s environment committee discussed Sept. 25.

Investigators look into what caused thousands of bees to die in Spokane neighborhood

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(KREM) Bee investigators from the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Agriculture arrived this week to begin looking into what caused the rapid die off. Investigators are asking questions to people who live in Corbin Park about what they’ve noticed to try and pinpoint a cause. They suited up, took pictures of the neighborhood, collected some of the dead bees and took samples of hives.

Lawsuit challenges EPA’s 200 million-acre expansion of pesticide harmful to bees

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(Center for Biological Diversity) The Center for Biological Diversity and Center for Food Safety have sued the Trump administration over its July decision to approve use of the pesticide sulfoxaflor across more than 200 million acres of crops. The approval was granted despite the fact that the Environmental Protection Agency’s own scientists concluded that sulfoxaflor is “very highly toxic” to bees. The decision expands the pesticide’s use to a wide range of crops that attract bees, including soybeans, cotton, strawberries, squash and citrus. The Center’s fact sheet on sulfoxaflor can be found here.