Unpopular opinion: saving honey bees does very little to save the bees

Image of garden path.

(Garden Ecology Lab, Oregon State University) “I am not suggesting that you extinguish honey bees from your garden. What I am asking, instead, is that you take the time to learn about and to notice some of the other 80+ species of bee that you might find in your garden… The first step to saving something you love is to be able to recognize it and to call it by name.”

Climate change could pit species against one another as they shift ranges

Image of wildflowers with mountain in background.

(University of British Columbia) Species have few good options when it comes to surviving climate change; they can genetically adapt to new conditions, shift their ranges, or both. But new research indicates that conflicts between species as they adapt and shift ranges could lead experts to underestimate extinctions, and underscores the importance of landscape connectivity. “The good news is this conflict between moving and adapting is reduced when movement rates are high, which emphasizes the importance of maintaining well-connected landscapes.”

New research provides important insights into how different species might survive extreme climate events

Image of blazing sun over city.

(Washington University in St. Louis) Faced with unprecedented change in their environments, animals and plants are scrambling to catch up — with mixed results. Researchers have developed a new model that helps to predict the types of changes that could drive a given species to extinction. This model could give wildlife managers and conservation organizations insight into the potential vulnerabilities of different species based on relatively simple assessments of their natural histories and historical environments.

Xerces’ Newest Community Science Project: Nebraska Bumble Bee Atlas

Image of bumble bee on flower.

(Xerces Society) To help further our understanding of, and conservation efforts for, bumble bees, The Xerces Society has launched the Nebraska Bumble Bee Atlas. This community science project offers locals the opportunity to work alongside researchers to collect data that will shed light on the distribution, status, and habitat needs of Nebraska’s bumble bees.

Return of long-lost bees creating a lot of Presidio buzz

Image of research in field with net.

(San Francisco Chronicle) Silver digger bees began to disappear as the vast coastal prairie on the western side of San Francisco was paved over for development and were all but gone by the mid-20th century. But their recent rediscovery is an example of how the removal of invasive plants and the restoration of dunes and grasses at a former military base have helped bring back this lost species that had thrived here for tens of thousands of years before the city was built.