$3.7 billion for parks, climate resiliency, and public lands approved by voters

Image of trees in forest.

(The Trust for Public Land) Following on the heels of unprecedented increases in visitation to public lands – from neighborhood parks to national parks – during the COVID-19 crisis, the 2020 election gave voters in 48 jurisdictions throughout the country an opportunity to weigh in on the value of outdoors spaces to their quality of life.

Federally protected lands reduce habitat loss and protect endangered species

Satellite map of United States.

(Tufts University) Using more than 30 years of earth satellite images, scientists at Tufts University and Defenders of Wildlife have discovered that habitat loss for imperiled vertebrate species in the U.S. during that period was more than twice as great on non-protected private lands than on federally protected lands.

‘Buzz off honey industry, our national parks shouldn’t be milked for money’

Image showing collection of Australian native bees and one wasp.

(The Conversation) “Native pollinator populations have been decimated in burned areas. They will only recover if they can recolonise from unburned areas as vegetation regenerates. Since the fires, Australia’s beekeeping industry has been pushing for access to national parks and other unburned public land… But our native pollinators badly need these resources – and the recovery of our landscapes depends on them. While we acknowledge the losses sustained by the honey industry, authorities should not jeopardise our native species to protect commercial interests.”